Home Fire Safety Plan

Dated: November 2 2019

Views: 1059



During my 17 years in real estate, I've posted about my family's almost fatal experience with carbon monoxide, as well as a variety of safety issues, including fire safety. In light of a devastating tragedy in my hometown last week, it think it's time to post some tips on fire safety again. After all, my carbon monoxide tips over the years have saved at least one family from tragedy. And as we know, chance always favors the prepared.

Hopefully it goes without saying that every home should have multiple and properly functioning smoke detectors, both ionization and photoelectric types, as well as chemically appropriate fire extinguishers, e.g water, foam, dry powder, CO2 or wet chemical, placed in easily accessible areas of the home. The smoke detectors should be tested regularly, and updated upon expiration, and new batteries should be kept on hand and so you don't ever go without proper protection. And fire extinguishers should also be checked from time to time to make sure they are full.

In addition, every homeowner should also have a fire safety plan, including an escape route for each person and from each room. All occupants of the household should know this plan, and there should be drills from time to time, especially in the dark, as vision is severely limited during a fire. Also, each person should know how to operate the windows and window locks in each room, as well as fire extinguishers, and possible window ladders if more than one story. While it's not prudent to stay and fight a fast growing inferno, properly using an extinguisher for small fires can limit damage and potentially save lives.

Part of a plan can also include being able to grab important items such as a wallet, purse, cell phone, family photo album or other - only if it's safe - on the way out of the home.

When my kids were young, I liked having the doors to my kids rooms open at night to know they were alright. But that is not wise in terms of fire safety. Here's a video illustrating what a fire can do to a home with open versus closed bedroom doors.

Further, have a meeting place outside where everyone will go. Many times people have died going back into fires trying to save a loved one they thought was still inside, but who had already escaped.

Last, please take this seriously, and share this information. We never think this will happen to us or someone we love or know. But it does, and it can lead to a heartbreaking tragedy. We can't prevent every circumstance, certainly, but good preparation will certainly give us a better chance on avoiding those trying to befall us. God bless, and be safe!

Blog author image

David Roney

I love helping people transact real estate, honestly! Providing excellent service, honest insight, and offering a perspective from my experience in construction that 90% of agents don't have allows me....

Latest Blog Posts

Home Fire Safety Plan

During my 17 years in real estate, I've posted about my family's almost fatal experience with carbon monoxide, as well as a variety of safety issues, including fire safety. In light of a

Read More

Time for Roof Maintenance!

Arizonans hoping to do roof maintenance might want to make haste. I was up on my roof this week doing some maintenance on my turbine "whirlybird" roof vents. They'd begun to squeak, and needed to be

Read More

Carbon Monoxide Detectors Save Lives!!

As we get nearer to fall and people start turning on their furnaces, I want to share with you the story of when our furnace's heat exchanger cracked. It was just before Christmas 2004 when we were

Read More